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id="post-257">
May 27th, 2010

L.A Outreach

KSC Team

Throughout 2010, we’re doing KSC science outreach workshops for kids in the Los Angeles area. This project is made possible by the American Honda Foundation.

Check out some images from the previous workshops: [...]

L.A. Outreach

L.A. Outreach

L.A. Outreach

L.A. Outreach

L.A. Outreach

L.A. Outreach

L.A. Outreach

L.A. Outreach


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April 9th, 2010

Jumping Roach!

KSC Team

This entry came from A.N. of Sterling, VA and S.B. from Centerville, VA. They made one of the jumping roaches from our downloadable Bio-Inspired activities kits! If any readers have also made your own jumping roaches, please send us pictures!

jumpingtestkscentry


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April 1st, 2010

What a great group of entries.

KSC Team

I loved the ideas that seemed to come from no-where.  The games that did not too closely mirror any one game on Earth.  I especially appreciated when the students incorporated elements in their games that directly related to some aspect of the Martian environment.  Most of the students included drawings with their entry and that really helped me to “see” what they had in mind.

Stephenie Lievense, NASA/JPL; judge “Imagining Sports on Mars”


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March 30th, 2010

Scientist Christopher Viney is impressed

BioInspired Scientists Winners

cviney-smAfter just a first glance at the entries, I was already quite impressed by how many really good ideas there were.  The future of science and technology is in very good hands (and heads)!

Entries that particularly caught my eye were those that were clearly bio-inspired, in the best spirit of what the contest was about.  “Bio-inspired” is about developing an idea from something that nature does, and not merely using a natural product for something.

Another factor that, for me, contributes to the eventual success of an entry is whether or not the idea is simple.   By “simple”, I don’t necessarily mean “easy”.  I mean an idea that is elegant, with a good likelihood that it can be made to work in some useful way.  I am really being guided by a long-used philosophical principle known as “Ockham’s Razor” (named for William of Ockham, a monk who lived 700 years ago), which states that the simplest solution to a problem is usually the best solution.
Science at its best will have a positive impact on society – it has the capacity to improve the quality of life.  Entries that connected their proposal to a plausible benefit of this kind were more likely to hold my attention.

Ultimately, I was most captivated by those entries that made me want to run into the lab and start doing some experiments.  I am looking forward to doing just that in the company of the winner.  And I very much hope that kids everywhere, when they read about the winning projects, will want to work with their teachers and/or families and/or friends to try some related experiments too.


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March 29th, 2010

Flying Geckos

KSC Team

A team in California created these paper Flying Geckos (and other flying animal oddities), as tests of Bio-Inspired flying machines!